Food Tidings

10
May

Tangy Tomato Brisket

Tangy Tomato Brisket; a recipe from The Pioneer Woman is sure to please the any crowd!
Photo Credit: Van Dyke Family, Brisket Day

We love having “Brisket Day” at our house and this is one of our favorite recipes. Four ingredients make it simple, easy and quick to put together – my kind of recipe. Then, you just enjoy the aromatherapy as it cooks all day. Whether for your family, a new mom, as Ree Drummond, The Pioneer Woman suggestions in her cookbook, “The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food From My Frontier” (& we agree!), or for anyone who could use some comfort food — this is sure to please!

The Pioneer Woman said it, and we can vouch for it! Brisket is great to deliver to a new mama.

I was signed up to deliver a FoodTidings meal to a friend, so I just doubled the recipe and called it a day. Yes, that’s a LOT of meat – but, with my current crew of 5, including 3 growing teenagers, we barely had any leftovers. I’m glad I put my FoodTidings portion in its own pan, or it might not have made it out of the house!

Make this easy recipe for your family or a FoodTidings meal and be blessed by Brisket!

Tangy Tomato Brisket

Makes 8 servings

Ingredients:

  • One 5- to 8-pound beef brisket, trimmed of all fat (the butcher can do this for you!)
  • One 24-ounce bottle ketchup or chili sauce
  • 1 package dry onion soup mix
  • 1 cup water
  • Optional: Several dashes hot sauce, for spicier brisket

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 275 degrees F.
  2. Place the brisket in an oven-safe pan (see tip below!). Combine the ketchup and soup mix in a bowl, and then stir it around to mix. Pour in 1 cup water and stir to combine. (You can add more or less water as needed)
  3. Pour the sauce all over the brisket, and then flip the brisket over to coat the other side. Now just cover the pan with foil and roast in the oven for 6 to 7 hours.
  4. Remove the pan from the oven and test the brisket to make sure it’s fork-tender. The brisket should fall apart if you look at it! Slice the brisket into thin strips, then return the beef to the sauce and keep it warm until you’re ready to serve.

Source: The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food From My Frontier, By Ree Drummond, p. 180-81

Watch The Pioneer Woman’s Brisket How to Video here!

Aluminum pans make it an easy clean up!

Tiding Tips:

1. A disposable aluminum pan works great, and is convenient for you and the Food Tidings Recipient.
2. Double the pan up to help avoid leaks during transport and when cutting the meat!!

Rolls, Baked Potatoes, Salad & Brownie Bites are great options to complete the FoodTidings meal.

Know a New Mama?

Celebrate the new bundle of joy and encourage the whole family with a FoodTidings!

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Crystal Van Dyke

Food Tidings Blog Contributor

I loved FoodTidings.com at first sight. My husband and I had the opportunity to join the Food Tidings team in 2011 as Partners, after meeting the original co-founders at our church. I have a Bachelors in Public Administration from the University of Arizona (Go Wildcats!) and a Masters in Health Services Administration/Strategic Planning & Marketing from The George Washington University. We planned my early retirement from the market 3 kids in and was blessed with a 4th to complete us; finishing with 2 boys & 2 girls. Our oldest is now launched, happily married and proudly serving in the Air Force, while the three at home keep us on our toes, amazed and inspired. As a full-time Wife and Mom, this website is my side-gig that serves as a personal ministry for our family. Seeing caring communities created, hope spread and generosity in action continues to be a motivator for all of us.  Matt 5:16

2
May

Grocery Tidings to the Rescue

Tidings are meant to bring comfort and joy. Grocery Tidings can give that and more, trust me.

It was one of those weeks. One of our cars broke down. We discovered our hot water heater had kicked the bucket by walking onto soggy wet carpet in our master closet. We were in the middle of getting a rehab stay situated for a close relative. Our schedule was full with work and kid activities. Then, my sunglasses lost a screw. That little sucker would change my next few months.

My parents live with us in our guest-house-turned-grandparents’-home, which I’m very grateful for – makes visits and caregiving much easier. Since my Dad has always been the ‘fix it man”, I ran over to have him fix my sunglasses. He was tracking down a replacement screw and in the midst of it, tripped over a toolbox. Life came to a screeching halt in that moment as my 77 year old Dad broke his hip.

Needless to say, my caregiving went to the next level. Now that my Dad was out of commission for at least 12 weeks, I added full time caregiver for my Mom, who had suffered a mild stroke and was recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease, to my schedule; in addition to my other wife, mom, work and life duties. I was grateful we were managing, but time was short and my to-do list was getting longer.

Then, my door bell rang. It was unexpected. I threw on a ball cap to cover my un-showered hair and ran to the door. I wasn’t in my PJs that day, so that was at least something. When I opened the door, it was like the heavens opened to bright blue sky, sweet music rang out and doves fluttered around. OK, there were no doves or music, but the sky was blue. More importantly, a dear sweet friend of mine was standing there holding bags filled with groceries.

I held it together as she handed me the bags and gave us get-well-wishes for my Dad and said she hoped I was hanging in there. I couldn’t speak, but our eye contact said enough. Being the understanding friend she is, she quickly said good bye and waved as she ran back to her car. I shut the door and, I’ll admit, a few tears hit my groceries as I walked to the kitchen.

I quickly blamed my misty eyes on my lack of sleep and the sweetness of generosity, as my kids looked at me weird. Then, after loading our pantry & refrigerator with the goodies she had brought and collecting myself, I immediately texted my friend a ton of emojis to express my thanks and appreciation of her, despite my lack of words.

Tiding Tip

Giving groceries to a family helps with food and extra margin to their schedule; time saved is always a welcomed gift!

My husband and kids were rallying to help and we had meal preparation covered. However, not having to run another errand gave us some needed margin. The gesture of gifting groceries, including actually doing the shopping & delivery so we were stocked with some snacks and prepared to make meals, was so thoughtful, useful and appreciated.

While I may forget what the actual grocery items were, I will always remember my friend showing up. Sometimes, that’s all it takes. Generosity and hope can take on so many forms and this time, groceries fit the bill.

Restocking the pantry is always a useful and appreciated gift.
Delivery makes it easy for everyone!

So, next time you know of a family or friend going through something – caring for a new baby, battling illness, fighting for their life, healing from a surgery, job change or anything else life throws at them – consider the many ways that you might be able to show up. Set up a Food Tidings schedule to help with meal support, make or send them a meal, get them groceries, have their house cleaned, write them a note or just let them know you’re praying for them. Big or small doesn’t matter. Showing up, does. 

FoodTidings is more than a website, it’s a community of people that show up. Our site will continue to add new features, services and products to help you help others; including things like grocery delivery, house cleaning gift certificates, lawn service gift certificates, thoughtful gifts for unique times in life and ways to collect funds so Recipients can use it as they see fit, and more. Stay tuned!

Our wish is that FoodTidings will help YOU spread encouragement, hope and generosity. Who can you show up for? 

Show You Care

Rally support!

avatar

Crystal Van Dyke

FoodTidings Contributor

I loved FoodTidings.com at first sight. My husband and I had the opportunity to join the Food Tidings team in 2011 as Partners, after meeting the original co-founders at our church. I have a Bachelors in Public Administration from the University of Arizona (Go Wildcats!) and a Masters in Health Services Administration/Strategic Planning & Marketing from The George Washington University. We planned my early retirement from the market 3 kids in and was blessed with a 4th to complete us; finishing with 2 boys & 2 girls. Our oldest is now launched, happily married and proudly serving in the Air Force, while the three at home keep us on our toes, amazed and inspired. As a full-time Wife and Mom, this website is my side-gig that serves as a personal ministry for our family. Seeing caring communities created, hope spread and generosity in action continues to be a motivator for all of us.  Matt 5:16

24
Apr

How to Ask for Help without Making the Internet Mad

People dream of having a post go viral. However, this is a nightmare you want to avoid.

An expectant Philadelphia couple recently went viral for an eyebrow-raising request. In a post on another site like FoodTidings.com, the husband explained that he and his wife were expecting their first child — and, as social media users were fast to point out, expecting a lot from their neighbors, too. In his note, he asked for volunteers to help support them — via 30+ specific meals, emotional support and house chores. This was met with a cynical eye, to say the least.

In fact, their post was viciously ridiculed online. Given the backlash that was unleashed via national news outlets, I’m guessing that many new soon-to-be parents or people dealing with an illness might be hesitant to ask for help.

However, let me assure you – it’s OK to ask your friends, family members, neighbors and even co-workers for support. You just have to do it graciously.

Photo Credit: joemartinez.com

We were meant to do life together. When somebody is sick or has a baby, we want to rally around them. Although, asking complete strangers for food, then being very specific with what you want, feels demanding; especially in our tone-deaf, electronic world.

Whether you are about to have a baby, have a surgery scheduled or are dealing with a chronic illness, here are basic tips in asking for help – whether it’s online or in person:

“You just have to do it graciously.”

Leading with humility, grace and love smooths the path for support.

Let someone be your advocate

It can seem aggressive to personally post links all over message boards and social media sites. Rather, have a friend, family member, co-worker or church volunteer be the “Organizer”. Let somebody be your advocate and rally people on your behalf. Let them share, “Hey, our friend is going to be recovering over the next couple of weeks, let’s help.”

While it’s ideal for someone else to organize support on your behalf, the reality is when it comes to getting the word out, you or someone in your immediate family are often in the best position to reach your community. Generally, no one else will conveniently have access to all your contacts. You can very tastefully give support info by sharing something like, “Thank you to all who have offered to help our family, we are so grateful. My good friend asked me to share this with you…” (then, include the FoodTidings link or other info you are sharing). This is totally acceptable, and appreciated by those that know you.

Offer suggestions, don’t dictate

Supporters appreciate direction. Adding notes about dietary or medical restrictions are necessary (no one wants to make a condition worse!) and mentioning favorite foods or restaurants is super helpful. Asking strangers to make specific recipes is less reasonable; especially if there’s not a medical need.

To be clear, trying to eat “clean” or “Keto” is most often a choice, not a mandatory need. Chances are that you’ll cheat on any diet, at some point. Someone offering to make a meal for you is a great day not to be legalistic and to just enjoy the gift. You can hop right back on your “cleaner” wagon as soon as you are able.

Also, recognize that people want to help, but they do have their own lives going on; they may live far away, not be the best cook or just have a really busy week. Being willing to accept assistance in various forms; such as homemade meals, delivered meals, groceries, money gifts, chores, a visit or just a prayer. Gently outlining a few clear options for them is always nice, but allow people to figure out the best way they can support and contribute, guilt free. If you really can’t or don’t want to use a gift – feel free to (discreetly) give it away to someone that can use it. Let’s consider it regifting at its best – a win-win-win, with no hurt feelings.

Be grateful

Everyone wants to see the ‘star of the show’, and give their good wishes. If possible, make an effort to be on hand to accept the gifts your neighbors worked hard to deliver. However, most people will understand if recovering from surgery is expected to be particularly hard or that trying to catch naps to heal will have random timing. Coolers are on the porch can be used, but be sure that participants understand why that is necessary. Taping a “Hello” or “Sorry we missed you” note to the inside of the lid can be a surprise that will make them smile and let them know you wish you could have greeted them in person.

Always follow up with a thank you. The beauty of an online schedule is that it keeps a list of participants for you, so you don’t have to try to remember the details yourself. An email or handwritten note to acknowledge gifts is always welcomed and appreciated. 

In fact, in my book, a thank you is a requirement. I used to tell my kids, “If you’re not willing to write a thank you, then you shouldn’t take the gift.” If circumstances prevent you from doing a thank you yourself, be sure to ask someone to help with that, as well. A grateful heart goes a long way and I have no doubt that someone would love to be the hand that pays it forward for you.

Offer a hand

Do you know a family that is having a new baby, facing surgery, fighting cancer or dealing with a chronic illness? Save them from having to ask for help, see what support they could use and offer to be their advocate or organizer. Often, giving of yourself is so much sweeter than receiving.


Be An Advocate

Rally support for someone you know


avatar

Crystal Van Dyke

FoodTidings Contributor

I loved FoodTidings.com at first sight. My husband and I had the opportunity to join the Food Tidings team in 2011 as Partners, after meeting the original co-founders at our church. I have a Bachelors in Public Administration from the University of Arizona (Go Wildcats!) and a Masters in Health Services Administration/Strategic Planning & Marketing from The George Washington University. We planned my early retirement from the market 3 kids in and was blessed with a 4th to complete us; finishing with 2 boys & 2 girls. Our oldest is now launched, happily married and proudly serving in the Air Force, while the three at home keep us on our toes, amazed and inspired. As a full-time Wife and Mom, this website is my side-gig that serves as a personal ministry for our family. Seeing caring communities created, hope spread and generosity in action continues to be a motivator for all of us.  Matt 5:16

2
Apr

Food Tidings and The Joy Bus Share Common Goal to Support Cancer Patients

Source: https://www.thejoybusdiner.com/

Don’t you love meeting kindred spirits? While I had never actually met the people at the Joy Bus Diner, as soon as I saw their tagline, “Making our valley a happier place one meal at a time” and their mission to deliver meals to cancer patients, I knew we must be kindred spirits.

In fact, something kept drawing me to their work; from a Costco magazine write up to social media posts, I kept running into them; so I had to find out more. They are a local Arizona organization, the birthplace of Food Tidings and our home base for operations. While their service is targeted to a specific area in Phoenix, it’s too good not to share with everyone. At the very least, I hope others will be inspired to create a “community that cares” in their local area; a goal that Food Tidings and The Joy Bus mutually share.

The Joy Bus is a Not for Profit organization whose sole purpose is to relieve the daily struggles of homebound cancer patients with a fresh Chef Inspired meal and a friendly face. Like Food Tidings, The Joy Bus aims to relieve the burden put on families during this time. Seems like a match made in “meaningful meals” heaven, right?

“The Joy Bus is a nonprofit organization that delivers fresh, chef-inspired meals, social support, and nutrition education at no cost to homebound cancer patients within a 10 mile radius of 32nd Street and Shea Blvd in Phoenix. We deliver a meal each Friday and the meal is just half the fun, our clients also get paired with an awesome volunteer who is there for them to chat with and help in anyway they can. If a potential client is located outside of our delivery radius we do encourage them to still reach out as we try to make small exceptions wherever we can.”

TheJoyBusDiner.com

While The Joy Bus provides meals once a week, this is where Food Tidings complements their efforts. A Food Tidings meal schedule allows family, friends and co-workers to organize and rally, both near and far, to support cancer patients with meals they may need at other times. Being “kindred spirits”, my hope is that we both continue to serve as a resource to inspire, encourage and support cancer patients and their families, all week long.

Knowing people care about you can do wonders in the process of cancer treatment. All it takes is one person to get rolling; on “The Joy Bus” and/or with a “Food Tidings” meal schedule. Just imagine the difference we can make, together!

If you or someone you know in the local, Phoenix area can benefit from their services, I hope you’ll jump on board and check them out. Whether you need assistance or not, you can support The Joy Bus mission by stopping by The Joy Bus Diner and enjoying a meal that pays it forward; as all proceeds support The Joy Bus operations.

Let’s keep making meals meaningful and enjoy the ride, as we spread tidings of food, comfort and joy.

Love this quote.
Source: https://www.thejoybusdiner.com/
The Joy Bus CEO & Founder, Jennifer Caraway, with diner and meal delivery volunteers.

More details:

The Joy Bus Diner

FoodTidings.com

Know Someone Fighting Cancer?

Support them with a free FoodTidings schedule.


avatar

Crystal Van Dyke

Food Tidings Blog Contributor

I loved FoodTidings.com at first sight. My husband and I had the opportunity to join the Food Tidings team in 2011 as Partners, after meeting the original co-founders at our church. I have a Bachelors in Public Administration from the University of Arizona (Go Wildcats!) and a Masters in Health Services Administration/Strategic Planning & Marketing from The George Washington University. We planned my early retirement from the market 3 kids in and was blessed with a 4th to complete us; finishing with 2 boys & 2 girls. Our oldest is now launched, happily married and proudly serving in the Air Force, while the three at home keep us on our toes, amazed and inspired. As a full-time Wife and Mom, this website is my side-gig that serves as a personal ministry for our family. Seeing caring communities created, hope spread and generosity in action continues to be a motivator for all of us.  Matt 5:16

14
Oct

Ordering Meals for the Week

Week of Meals and Soup

 

 



Did you know that we now have the ability for you to order several days’ or even a week’s worth of delicious, gourmet meals to be sent to a family member or friend — even if they don’t have a schedule created on their behalf?

Several of our new vendors, including Rockin’ the Ladle and Veestro, have put together custom multi-meal packages only available through Food Tidings.

So now you can collect those $1, $5 and $10 donations and put them to a very, VERY delicious use! See the quick video below for step-by-step ordering instructions.